Fairytale Wishes

Fairytale WishesMomtrepreneur Debbie Glickman brings Fairytale Wishes, aromatherapy products with a twist, into the Shark Tank in episode 503. Debbie started making scented sprays to help her kids overcome common childhood fears and anxieties. She uses Monster Repellent, a bubble gum scented spray, to put the fear of monsters under the bed to rest. There are 5 sprays in all including Super Hero spray for any situation requiring “extra courage,” Tooth Fairy Spray to attract the tooth fairy, Sweet Dreams spray to help curb fears of bad dreams, and Happy Camper spray to ease separation anxiety when a kid is away from home. The Super Hero Spray also helps children suffering from nausea caused by certain medications or chemotherapy treatments. Each bottle of Fairytale Wishes spray comes with a little fairytale story told by Freddie, the magical Fairytale Wishes frog that explains how kids can overcome their fears. The pleasant scents are soothing to kids too.

Fairytale Wishes Shark Tank Recap

Debbie Glickman offers the Sharks an opportunity to buy into her Fairytale Wishes company, offering 33% of her company in return for a $35,000 investment. She explains that her son was afraid of the dark when he was small, and that she designed her aromatherapy style sprays to help children relax and feel more secure when going to sleep or facing other stressful situations.

Her “Sweet Dreams” spray is lavender scented. The line also includes a “Monster Repellent” which is bubble-gum scented. She passes out samples of pillows sprayed with the oils. The sprays cost approximately $2.16 to make, and sell for $9.95. Glickman's been in business for four years, and in the past year achieved sales of $5,500. Bed, Bath, and Beyond featured the product over the holidays and re-ordered three times, but when the Fairytale Wishes sprays were not featured at the front of the store, sales dropped and the retailer stopped ordering.

“Here's the truth,” says Kevin O'Leary, “You don't have a business. You have a hobby.” He's out.

The Sharks tear down her business acumen, saying that the sales simply don't pan out.

Lori Greiner suggests that Glickman might do better if she were able to make smaller bottles and package them together, offering parents more variety.

Barbara Corcoran agrees that a new approach to marketing is needed, but says, “I don't want to take that ride with you. I'm out.”

Glickman says she'd like to try to partner with Disney. Robert Herjavec tells her that “A goal without a deadline is nothing but a dream.” He's out.

Mark Cuban tells her that sales are not her strength, and that she needs to “get someone to sell it for you.” He's out. Only Lori Greiner remains.

Greiner thinks Glickman's creativity is “fantastic,” but she doesn't believe she's tried “hard enough to make your dream come true.” She's out. Fairytale Wishes doesn't get a Shark Tank deal.

Fairytale Wishes Shark Tank Update

Fairytale Wishes remains marginally successful, with 1,500 likes on the Facebook  page and an active website. The social media sites are rarely updated, but appear to be current. The site offers online ordering, or a “store locator” that marks retail outlets in most of the US and in parts of Canada. It seems that Glickman has gotten a foothold in the niche market with her line of aromatherapy sprays, and continues to scare monsters away, even without the help of the Sharks.

Posts About Fairytale Wishes on Shark Tank Blog

Monster Repellent

Fairytale Wishes Information

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