Mark Sullivan Generator Follow Up

Mark Sullivan Generator
Mark Sullivan Generator. In the weeks before his segment aired on Shark Tank, I couldn’t find out a darn thing about him or his invention. He was a mystery wrapped in an enigma. Once Mark Sullivan appeared on Shark Tank, he became easier to find.

In what had to be one of the oddest segments on the show to date, Mr. Sullivan pitched a “product” that he claimed could change the  world. While Mr. Sullivan appears to be a nice guy whose heart is in the right place, I am not sure if he was for real. His “Mark Sullivan Generator,” which he alleges can create energy for free while simultaneously mining gold from seawater is a logistical impossibility. One of our readers commented that in order for it to work, it would need to be a mile high. That seems a bit too large for practical purposes as construction and maintenance would be expensive and, I would assume, prone to catastrophic break down. It would certainly cost more than the $1 million Mr. Sullivan was seeking from the Sharks.

I decided to have my own in-house expert evaluate the Mark Sullivan Generator. My dad is a nuclear engineer who was in the power business for 35 years. We watched the Mark Sullivan segment on DVR and, when he stopped laughing, he told me the machine would never work. He said the power required to generate the Coriolis Effect sufficient enough to create energy would most likely exceed the output of the generator itself. The Mark Sullivan Generator simply would not work.

I explored Mr. Sullivan’s website. He is definitely a smart guy; he’s a member of the Mensa Society. His site lists all sorts of contributions to industry, but there is no documentation of his claims of creating inventions for “diverse industries.” He claims he’s completed post-graduate studies in bio-engineering and physiology, but has no advanced degrees. He did, however, build a pretty kick ass dune buggy.

Mark Sullivan may be smart, and his mission “to leave a legacy of goodness for the world” is certainly admirable, but I think the guy is over evaluating the impact of his “inventiveness.” I believe the Shark Tank producers put the Mark Sullivan Generator on the show for comic relief. It is nice to believe there is a free, renewable source of energy that is yet undiscovered and I truly do hope someone finds something as revolutionary as the Mark Sullivan Generator (that actually works) someday. Unfortunately for Mr. Sullivan, his invention will never work and his legacy will most likely be that of  “the wacky inventor on Shark Tank.”

Eco Nuts Soap Nuts Natural Laundry
About Rob Merlino

Real Estate Agent, Entrepreneur, auteur, raconteur. Rob Merlino is a blogger and writer who enjoys the Shark Tank TV show and Hot Dogs. A father of five who freelances in a variety of publications, Rob has a stable of websites including Shark Tank Blog, Hot Dog Stories, Rob Merlino.com and more.
Rob can help you buy or sell real estate anywhere in the United States.

Comments

  1. I checked his website too. Why does he have pictures of ice cream as Visual Arts 1? If that’s art, there are many fine artists at Baskin Robbins.

  2. Being a member of mensa just means he is good at taking tests and solving riddles. Cuban was right when he said that his BS meter was going through the roof

  3. Don’t be so quick to abandon ideas that you can’t understand. We think we understand physics, but ideas that break these assumptions occur all the time. I’m not saying Sullivan’s invention will work, but just because you don’t understand it does not mean it won’t. Many people suffer from the restrictions of education, teaching us that things work a certain way. This has impeded progress over the years.

    Consider the following “impossible” item.

    http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2014/0804/NASA-test-demonstrates-impossible-propulsion-system-video

Speak Your Mind

*

Get great posture NOW